Thursday, March 15, 2018

Tyler Cowen on conspiracy theories

I have a cold and am taking a sick day, but I thought sombunall of you would enjoy Tyler Cowen's column on conspiracy theories. He offers his own answer to the question of what is the most plausible and underrated conspiracy, and it strikes me as a quite plausible theory.

5 comments:

Eric Wagner said...

I hope you feel better. I have Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis playing. Perhaps Beethoven may heal you today.

Inigo Montoya said...

Cannabis works wonders, too. RAW would approve. :-)

Benjay Turpin said...

Cowan could have researched and written on specific documented pro sports plots to ensure profit/victory in American history. Lots of documented cheating in baseball, amid proven collusion. Follow the white lighter: "The white lighter myth or white lighter curse is an urban legend based on the 27 Club of which several musicians and artists died while in possession of a white lighter, causing white lighters to be blamed for bad fortune. The myth is primarily based on the deaths of Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison and Kurt Cobain."

"...The Iowa Baseball Confederacy tells the story of Gideon Clark, a man on a quest. He is out to prove to the world that the indomitable Chicago Cubs traveled to Iowa in the summer of 1908 for an exhibition game against an amateur league, the Iowa Baseball Confederacy. But a simple game somehow turned into a titanic battle of more than two thousand innings, and Gideon Clark struggles to set the record straight on this infamous game that no one else believes ever happened."

Metal UFOs from Space, Bigfeet in the Flesh, JFK Not A Mobster, etc. Elvis! Oz Fritz on Paul being dead from his blog makes sense - Oz beat that legend to death and back again.


"In the end, that's what Coover's novel is about: the need to control. This is manifest nowadays, but prescient at the novel's publishing. All of which just credits Coover; even played on paper, fantasy baseball in the '60s wasn't something one heard much about, and it's only in the internet era that it's exploded into a national pastime of its own.

"...a desire as old as Aeschylus -- the want, need rather, to administer unto ourselves an entire universe, to move the pieces, dictate the plays, and engineer the ultimate results. Other critics have compared the "moral" of Coover's to that of Bush and Rumsfeld's...need to compartmentalize, to count, to control has been with us since rising out of the muck; its modern variants afford so many opportunities previously unavailable, not even to mention computers.

"...unblinkingly....the mass of men living lives of quiet desperation.

"...The UBA should be read as an Emersonian call...spirit."
http://www.bookslut.com/nonfiction/2012_01_018613.php

Cleveland Okie (Tom Jackson) said...

@Eric: I do in fact listen to Beethoven when I am anxious or feel unwell, and I listened to some last night.

Eric Wagner said...

I hope you feel better today, Tom. I have Schnabel playing the Pathetique on right now.