Saturday, November 28, 2020

RAW lived here


2510 College Avenue, Berkeley, California. Photo by Branka Tesla


2035 Channel Way, Berkeley. Photo by Branka Tesla

I recently heard from Branka Tesla for the first time in a little while:

"As you know, there are also a few of RAW letters published in The Starseed Signals which reveal two addresses where RAW used to live in Berkeley: 2510 College Avenue and 2035 Channing Way. Since I live in Berkeley I walked to both addresses recently and took pictures. I don't know about you but visuals are important to me. What's missing on both of these buildings, in my view, is the plaque attached to the outside wall stating: 'In this building in 1974 lived, wrote and smoked pot Robert Anton Wilson.' "

If you use Google Maps you can see where the houses are located,what is nearby, etc. 

Thanks, Branka!

3 comments:

quackenbush said...

Sweet find. That 2nd one on Channel/Channing Way is rather impresssive.

Hugh said...

“‘In this building in 1974 lived, wrote and smoked pot Robert Anton Wilson.'”

You could always make and install that placard. I don’t know if it would be received by the owners the same way a Banksy installation would.

I know if it were my house, I sure would want it (even if I didn’t know who the hell some pothead named Robert Wilson was).

BFHN said...

I totally agree with this assertion that visuals are important!
I am happy that many RAW books features lots of uber cool pictures.
And I surround myself with posters, postcards, flyers and whatnots at home, so if I'm bored I just have to look anywhere to be entertained!

Going one step further we find moving pictures. I feel like RAW maybe did not discuss this enough and, if he definitely was into films from Orson Wells for instance, he doesnt struck me as being much of a cinephile.
But the incredible power of moving pictures, and the effect the montage and editing can have on the audience perception is like from another world. I am a huge fan of collages (both paper and video editing), and stuffs like Craig Baldwin's Tribulation 99 are to me a perfect glimpse of the mostly untapped possibilities offered by the media.