Monday, January 7, 2013

'Our own godhood'

Michael Johnson has an interesting post that examines a passage on The Widow's Son on how "we do not know our own godhood."

Michael writes:

So: with Wilson, there seems to be some sort of continuum of invention of words: here they flow into us, as if by revelation. But because we have decided to entertain this idea of where language comes from, and how it works in our lives, many of us have suffered needlessly. This passage also seems to imply that it's imperative that we not only figure out how we're "swindled" by language, but to own the god-power in ourselves (the only place "god" really exists?) and use language creatively, actively, to take back the power of language and to use it to better our lives.

Bonus: Michael demonstrates that RAW read Philip Jose Farmer (an old time science fiction writer who was a staple of my  youth) since way back.


Neil_in_Chicago said...

The most neglected of Wilson's major influences is Korzybski.

LJ said...

Farmer was one my teenage favourites too! I suppose it is logical that RW woudl like Farmer and vice versa but I didn't know it. farmer's Essex House novels were quite bizarre.

Bot RAW and farmer liked to mix fiction and reality, too.